[:it]International Day Against Fascism and Antisemitism[:]

[:it] 

Racism is a relic of the past or a real problem nowadays?

9th November 2018 marks the 80th anniversary of the ‘Kristallnacht’ pogrom in 1938 in Germany and Austria, turning the discrimination against Jews that started in 1933 to a systematic persecution, which culminated in the Holocaust merely three years later.

Fascism, however, did not cease to exist after 8th May 1945. Today, racist, fascist and Neo-Nazi movements are on the rise all over Europe. Neo-Nazis hunt and assault migrants, Muslims, Jews,  Roma, LGBTQ-activists, people living with disabilities and other minorities, using rallies as a cover-up for their hate-crimes.

Since the early 1990s, UNITED for Intercultural Action has organised and inspired annual pan-European antiracist activities on 9 November. This date has several reasons, firstly, to commemorate victims of the “Kristallnacht” pogrom and, more broadly, victims of the Holocaust and of fascism throughout history. Secondly, to raise awareness about the danger of racism, anti-semitism, right-wing extremism and neo-fascism today. The third main reason is to mobilise different groups and individuals to build a common front against xenophobia, intolerance, hate and violence.

The European Parliament is concerned by the increasing normalisation of fascism, racism and xenophobia and calls on EU member states to ban neo-fascist and neo-Nazi groups.

http://www.europarl.europa.eu/news/en/press-room/20181018IPR16527/parliament-demands-ban-on-neo-fascist-nd-neo-nazi-groups-in-the-eu

Interesting fact:

 

  • The name “Kristallnacht” (“Crystal Night”) was obtained in connection with the many broken windows of shops and shopping places. The occasion was the revenge for the murder of a German diplomat E. Rath by a Polish Jew, who committed an act of vengeance for the expulsion of his parents from Germany.
  • One of the largest manifestations of xenophobia was the apartheid regime in the Republic of South Africa. It was implemented by official policy that supported separated life of white and black people. For combating this phenomenon, Nelson Mandela was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize.

 

 

To  know more about the history of antisemitism you can take the online course developed by Yad Vashem, the world holocaust remembrance center. https://www.futurelearn.com/courses/antisemitism

For a short history of fascism click here[:]

“Signed Voices”: aperte le selezioni per uno scambio giovanile sulla LIS

Ti piacerebbe far parte di un nuovo entusiasmante programma di scambio giovanile Erasmus+ nell’estate 2018? Se hai tra i 18 e i 30 anni, sei sordo e vuoi conoscere di più sulla lingua dei segni britannica e internazionale, vorremmo sentirti. Quindi, di cosa stiamo parlando?

Questo entusiasmante scambio si basa sul progetto “Signed Voices” svolto in Inghilterra nel 2016, che ha catturato, attraverso dei video i ricordi, le esperienze e i valori contemporanei della Comunità inglese dei non udenti; per mostrarli oggi e conservarli per le generazioni future.

Esplorare il nostro patrimonio e quello degli altri è una via per il riconoscimento, il rispetto e l’identità. Tuttavia, la maggior parte delle persone non sa cosa significa “Patrimonio dei sordi” e ignora che le lingue dei segni dei diversi paesi sono lingue complesse con le proprie forme grammaticali e artistiche. Le persone sorde che usano LIS o le altre lingue dei segni hanno il loro patrimonio culturale e linguistico che però non sempre viene riconosciuto come tale dalle altre comunità linguistiche.

Signed Voices è stato un “progetto di storia orale” con al centro il linguaggio dei segni. Ha consentito ai membri della comunità dei sordi di condividere il proprio patrimonio con una comunità più ampia e ha creato un’eredità duratura. Deafway ha collaborato con i volontari Sordi per filmare ricordi e pensieri contemporanei, in brevi interviste semi-strutturate – condotte in lingua dei segni da coppie di persone sorde che hanno deciso il proprio argomento di intervista. Questo è culminato in un evento di celebrazione e riflessione condivisa.

Questo scambio sarà la continuazione del progetto originale, questa volta a livello europeo riunendo giovani sordi provenienti da Regno Unito, Polonia, Italia, Grecia ed Estonia per conoscere le comunità e le culture sorde di altri paesi. Avremo l’opportunità di conoscerci e di conoscere le nostre somiglianze e differenze, di crescere come giovani sordi europei. Durante lo scambio verrà insegnato ai partecipanti come filmare e modificare video. L’obiettivo dello scambio è quello di produrre video che riprendano conversazioni dei giovani partecipanti sui temi più vari per registrare e condividere le esperienze e i valori dei giovani sordi europei. I partecipanti potranno beneficiare di questi video e delle nuove competenze acquisite portandole nel proprio paese per replicare il progetto lì, rimanendo in contatto tra di loro per creare e rafforzare la rete di giovani sordi in tutta l’UE.

Lo scambio si svolgerà a Preston, in Inghilterra, dal 30 luglio al 14 agosto 2018. Tutti i viaggi e gli alloggi saranno pagati. Se sei interessato a film, media, eredità e cultura dei non udenti, questa è essere l’occasione per te.

Cliccando sul seguente link troverai il video della presentazione del progetto in LIS:
https://drive.google.com/file/d/1oL7u9wQjA8yDqaqCeMrvq5BSRTso818O/view?usp=sharing

Qui invece il video con tutte le informazioni su come candidarsi:
https://drive.google.com/file/d/1D8nQI9atATwnQ8i9xwkswlDzymQJuT3j/view?usp=sharing

[:it]Saffron from the UK tells us about her impressions of IRETI project[:]

[:it]Arriving to and being in Palermo is a strange, yet wonderful experience. An authentic robust city, filled to the brim with loud, rich culture. Palermo seems somehow untouched by society and the greater world, and I’ve been told quite a few times that Palermo is the closest thing, in terms of living, to Africa.

 

For me, as an African who has never been to the motherland, it’s very interesting to witness a community, which is likened to Africa, but it is even more interesting as the African community is prominent and proud. A walk through Ballaro will show you just how much, but there is a lingering question that remains whens coming across this community “Where are the women?”

 

The streets are dominated with males, and it makes me wonder, as someone who is in Palermo to work on the IRETI project, which explores the sex trafficking of the Nigerian Benin women with H.R.Y.O, where are the women of the African community? They’re rarely seen, and I then begin to wonder about the things I have learnt so far during my time here in this project.

 

Joining our mentor Alessandra to meetings quite often at Casa Mediterranea delle Donna, where we were able to meet with other women who worked with organisations revolving around Domestic Abuse, Women’s Rights, Prostitution and Sex Trafficking and creating safe spaces for women, I was able to learn of a law that has been implemented in Palermo, one that has banned women, during peak tourist times, to be within certain areas wearing revealing clothes. This was to defer those women who are either prostituting or have been sex trafficked from working in a space that the tourists, or the locals would see, causing them to hide, or worse, to be trafficked elsewhere.

 

It’s absurd to think that behind Palermo’s initial encapsulating charm, that below the surface lays a world that is rife with violence, drug abuse, sex trafficking and a government that would rather hide than protect. A world that not only makes you think about the safety of the migrant women, but one that makes you think of Palermo’s systems in whole.

 

The little I’ve seen, and the little I’ve learnt in my stay here has been both worrying and comforting- on one hand I see a community that seems tight knit, freedom, a village mentality and spaces that have been created to help migrants, integrate cultures, protect women and keep the community spirit of Palermo alive; and on the other, I’ve seen first hand the poverty, the lack of opportunities, the lack of societal structure and the divide in class and culture.

 

Still, without a doubt, I can say that I have fallen in love with this city and the way of life here, but more must be done.[:en]Arriving to and being in Palermo is a strange, yet wonderful experience. An authentic robust city, filled to the brim with loud, rich culture. Palermo seems somehow untouched by society and the greater world, and I’ve been told quite a few times that Palermo is the closest thing, in terms of living, to Africa.

 

For me, as an African who has never been to the motherland, it’s very interesting to witness a community, which is likened to Africa, but it is even more interesting as the African community is prominent and proud. A walk through Ballaro will show you just how much, but there is a lingering question that remains whens coming across this community “Where are the women?”

 

The streets are dominated with males, and it makes me wonder, as someone who is in Palermo to work on the IRETI project, which explores the sex trafficking of the Nigerian Benin women with H.R.Y.O, where are the women of the African community? They’re rarely seen, and I then begin to wonder about the things I have learnt so far during my time here in this project.

 

Joining our mentor Alessandra to meetings quite often at Casa Mediterranea delle Donna, where we were able to meet with other women who worked with organisations revolving around Domestic Abuse, Women’s Rights, Prostitution and Sex Trafficking and creating safe spaces for women, I was able to learn of a law that has been implemented in Palermo, one that has banned women, during peak tourist times, to be within certain areas wearing revealing clothes. This was to defer those women who are either prostituting or have been sex trafficked from working in a space that the tourists, or the locals would see, causing them to hide, or worse, to be trafficked elsewhere.

 

It’s absurd to think that behind Palermo’s initial encapsulating charm, that below the surface lays a world that is rife with violence, drug abuse, sex trafficking and a government that would rather hide than protect. A world that not only makes you think about the safety of the migrant women, but one that makes you think of Palermo’s systems in whole.

 

The little I’ve seen, and the little I’ve learnt in my stay here has been both worrying and comforting- on one hand I see a community that seems tight knit, freedom, a village mentality and spaces that have been created to help migrants, integrate cultures, protect women and keep the community spirit of Palermo alive; and on the other, I’ve seen first hand the poverty, the lack of opportunities, the lack of societal structure and the divide in class and culture.

 

Still, without a doubt, I can say that I have fallen in love with this city and the way of life here, but more must be done[:]

[:it]Julia shares her first impressions of Palermo[:]

[:it]

Social and language: Our apartment in Palermo houses volunteers from many different countries around Europe, so the common language is English. The girl from Belarus I am going to cooperate with throughout my stay in Palermo arrived on my second day of the introduction week. I’m looking forward to becoming better acquainted with the other volunteers. My first impression is that Sicilians prefer speaking Italian rather than English, so I hope to learn more Italian and I will be taking a language course through Erasmus+ Online Language Support.

 

Sightseeing: Some of us visited the city of Monreale, a bus-ride outside of Palermo. The view from Monreale was absolutely amazing with tall mountains, all the picturesque houses of Palermo and the big blue ocean. We also visited one of the local markets in Palermo. Here my new acquaintances helped me find good bargains on clothes, shoes and electronics. Later we visited one of the many beaches close to Palermo, and the water was lovely. We also visited a nature reserve with a beautiful view over the ocean.

We also went to a demonstration in Cinisi, another city outside of Palermo. This is an yearly gathering which praises Peppino Impastato. He was born in a Mafia family, but turned his back on and worked against them. He was killed by the Mafia fourty years ago. This happening gathers children, youngsters and grown-ups in a long parade with flags, slogans and songs.

As newcomers in Palermo it was very useful to walk around to the different places where we will work, and also get a feeling of local attractions and meetings points. We also tried to take the overcrowded buses, but I prefer walking,

if I have the time.

 

About the work: We got introduced to the H.R.Y.O. office. This office was once upon a time the stable in an aristocrat household, and has been modernized so it functions both as an office for several organizations and as a place for different cultural events. The people who work in the office seem really nice, warm and friendly, so I’m looking forward to get to know them better.

We are also going to work at the Emmaus secondhand shop, the Mercato Solidale, which is a grand and amazing shop with two floors full of big and small secondhand treasures. I am really looking forward to getting to know this shop more, since I’m a big fan of secondhand shops. I also agreed with one of the staff members that I can help him with learning English, while he helps me to learn Italian. I’m also really looking forward to the free, homemade Italian lunch we are going to get at the Mercato Solidale. It lies in walking distance between the apartment and the office/ the secondhand market.

 

Food and drink: When it comes to food have I tasted the local specialty “brioche con gelato”; which is a wheat bun with ice cream. It is delicious and can be compared to an ice-cream kebab. I had also the opportunity to taste cremino caffe which can be compared to an coffee milkshake, and is a special treat for coffee lovers. As a foodie I have also tasted different kinds of pizza, pasta, lasagna, fruit and coffee. And I’m looking forward to taste even more.[:]

[:it]Olga shares her first impressions of Palermo[:]

[:it]Hi everybody! I’m Olga from Minsk, Belarus. At the beginning of May I started my EVS in Italy with two NGOs – HRYO and Emmaus Palermo.

The project is for a year, but because of my passport expiry date I got visa for 355 days. So lifehack #1 for potential EVSers who will apply for visa check your passport expiry date in advance. Your passport have to be valid for 3 months after your coming back home.

The most popular question which I get from my Belarusian friends “What are you doing there?”. Okay, guys, l will explain.

HRYO – Human rights youth organization works with non-formal human rights education. They arrange different events to promote ideas of human rights among youngsters, especially they are focused on unprivileged social groups. So I am going to help them to find means of human rights promotion.

Emmaus Palermo – is a community of people who work in a charity shop which is in the outskirts of Palermo. There are about of 10 people in the organization. Some of them also live together in the house which is out of the city. There is a tradition in the shop – every day at 1 a.m. we have a lunch together. The shop is very big and on the 3rd floor there is a kitten, so we eat homemade food. I really feel at home there.

In Belarus I have been volunteering at a couple of organizations for 5 years. The topics were – homeless animals, veganism, human rights. So I decided to try myself in international volunteering. I found out about some programs and made decision that EVS is the best one. I was looking for a project on the EVS portal. Actually it took me a year to get to the project. There are some reasons for it. First, I was not looking for an opportunity to live abroad for a year, but wanted to upgrade my skills for NGO work to bring more benefit to my organization when I come back. And the second reason was that some European NGOs don’t want to work with partner countries because of bureaucracy. The was a case one organization in Budapest said to me that I was selected and in a week they wrote to me something like “We talked about you in our organization. We would prefer to have a volunteer from Europe”. But I didn’t give up after it. And then I found HRYO.

First time I wrote to them in winter 2017. They  refused me, because they had a selected volunteer for the coming project. I decided to write to them at the beginning of September and they selected me. On the 25th of December we found out the project was proved by the National Agency.

So that’s how I got in Palero. Now I live with 6 more people in the flat. We came in Palermo by three different programs to work at HRYO. My flatmates are from  Moldova, Romania, England, Norway, Spain. Here a Russian saying can be suitable “We are all so different and still we are together”.

As to the city of Palermo, the biggest advantages for me are:

  • The city is small enough. It is possible to walk to lots of places. Nevertheless there are some buses, trams and one metro line;
  • It is easy to be vegan here. Almost in any local supers I can find things with the label “vegan”. In Belarus vegans have more problems;
  • There are lots parks. I do like sitting under trees;
  • Most of local people are friendly and try to help foreigners.

There are some disadvantages either, sure, but the only one that is worth mentioning is the following. They take cash only in too many places, including cafes and the ATM don’t give cash if you use an American or British bank (and maybe some others). This brought many problems to my friend from the USA.

On the 9th of May I with 4 other volunteers of HRYO went to Cinissi, a small town 30 km from Palermo, to take part in the march of J. Impastato, the local hero who fought against mafia. We came there some hours earlier, so we had an opportunity to enjoy the landscapes. I was very happy to participate in the event, because in Belarus I go to peaceful assemblies as an observer only. So it was a new experience for me.

I hope the year will be useful for me and I will have a lot of fun either.[:]

[:it]Julia tells us her first impressions of Palermo[:]

[:it]Social and language: Our apartment in Palermo houses volunteers from many different countries around Europe, so the common language is English. The girl from Belarus I am going to cooperate with throughout my stay in Palermo arrived on my second day of the introduction week. I’m looking forward to becoming better acquainted with the other volunteers when I’m return in June. My first impression is that Sicilians prefer speaking Italian rather than English, so I hope to learn more Italian before I return, and I will be taking a language course through Erasmus+.
Sightseeing:
Some of us visited the city of Monreale, a bus-ride outside of Palermo. The view from Monreale was absolutely amazing with tall mountains, all the picturesque houses of Palermo and the big blue ocean. We also visited one of the local markets in Palermo. Here my new acquaintances helped me find good bargains on clothes, shoes and electronics. Later we visited one of the many beaches close to Palermo, and the water was lovely. We also visited a nature reserve with a beautiful view over the ocean.

 

 

We also went to a demonstration in Cinisi, another city outside of Palermo. This is an yearly gathering which praises Peppino Impastato. He was born in a Mafia family, but turned his back on and worked against them. He was killed by the Mafia fourty years ago. This happening gathers children, youngsters and grown-ups in a long parade with flags, slogans and songs.

 

 

As newcomers in Palermo it was very useful to walk around to the different places where we will work, and also get a feeling of local attractions and meetings points. We also tried to take the overcrowded buses, but I prefer walking, if I have the time.

About the work: We got introduced to the H.R.Y.O. office. This office was once upon a time the stable in an aristocrat household, and has been modernized so it functions both as an office for several organizations and as a place for different events. The people who work in the office seem really nice, warm and friendly, so I’m looking forward to get to know them better.

We are also going to work at the Emmaus secondhand shop, the Mercato Solidale, which is a grand and amazing shop with two floors full of big and small secondhand treasures. I am really looking forward to getting to know this shop more, since I’m a big fan of secondhand shops. I also agreed with one of the employees that I can help him with learning English, while he helps me to learn Italian. I’m also really looking forward to the free, homemade Italian lunch we are going to get at the Mercato Solidale. It lies in walking distance between the apartment and the office/ the secondhand market.

Food and drink: When it comes to food have I tasted the local specialty brioche; which is a wheat bun with gelato-ice cream. It is delicious and can be compared to an ice-cream kebab. I had also the opportunity to taste cremino caffe which can be compared to an coffee milkshake, and is a special treat for coffee lovers. As a foodie I have also tasted different kinds of pizza, pasta, lasagna, fruit and coffee. And I’m looking forward to taste even more…[:en]Social and language: Our apartment in Palermo houses volunteers from many different countries around Europe, so the common language is English. The girl from Belarus I am going to cooperate with throughout my stay in Palermo arrived on my second day of the introduction week. I’m looking forward to becoming better acquainted with the other volunteers when I’m return in June. My first impression is that Sicilians prefer speaking Italian rather than English, so I hope to learn more Italian before I return, and I will be taking a language course through Erasmus+.
Sightseeing:
Some of us visited the city of Monreale, a bus-ride outside of Palermo. The view from Monreale was absolutely amazing with tall mountains, all the picturesque houses of Palermo and the big blue ocean. We also visited one of the local markets in Palermo. Here my new acquaintances helped me find good bargains on clothes, shoes and electronics. Later we visited one of the many beaches close to Palermo, and the water was lovely. We also visited a nature reserve with a beautiful view over the ocean.

 

 

We also went to a demonstration in Cinisi, another city outside of Palermo. This is an yearly gathering which praises Peppino Impastato. He was born in a Mafia family, but turned his back on and worked against them. He was killed by the Mafia fourty years ago. This happening gathers children, youngsters and grown-ups in a long parade with flags, slogans and songs.

 

 

As newcomers in Palermo it was very useful to walk around to the different places where we will work, and also get a feeling of local attractions and meetings points. We also tried to take the overcrowded buses, but I prefer walking, if I have the time.

About the work: We got introduced to the H.R.Y.O. office. This office was once upon a time the stable in an aristocrat household, and has been modernized so it functions both as an office for several organizations and as a place for different events. The people who work in the office seem really nice, warm and friendly, so I’m looking forward to get to know them better.

We are also going to work at the Emmaus secondhand shop, the Mercato Solidale, which is a grand and amazing shop with two floors full of big and small secondhand treasures. I am really looking forward to getting to know this shop more, since I’m a big fan of secondhand shops. I also agreed with one of the employees that I can help him with learning English, while he helps me to learn Italian. I’m also really looking forward to the free, homemade Italian lunch we are going to get at the Mercato Solidale. It lies in walking distance between the apartment and the office/ the secondhand market.

Food and drink: When it comes to food have I tasted the local specialty brioche; which is a wheat bun with gelato-ice cream. It is delicious and can be compared to an ice-cream kebab. I had also the opportunity to taste cremino caffe which can be compared to an coffee milkshake, and is a special treat for coffee lovers. As a foodie I have also tasted different kinds of pizza, pasta, lasagna, fruit and coffee. And I’m looking forward to taste even more…[:]

[:it]Tina from Romania shares her first impressions of IRETI project[:]

[:it]

There is no doubt that the idea of volunteering abroad is a big leap of faith into the unknown, so when I first heard about “IRETI- Empowering Women and Strengthening Socioeconomic Integration” project in Palermo, I just said “No”. I thought I had multiple reasons to refuse: I was feeling I was too old to participate. I was frightened not to accommodate easily in a new city and environment. I feared not being able to fully relate to the topic or simply not being able to help enough. But then, I started to wondering myself if finding excuses for not going, not trying or not helping are actually..not helping me? So, with this in mind, I decided to give it a try, after all, in the worst case scenario, I could just call it quits and just return home. Useless to say that wasn’t the case. My first week here passed in a heartbeat, adjusting myself living in Palermo being surprisingly easy, as was discovering Palermo’s rich culture, history and of course the vibrant nightlife.

As the days passed and we started focusing on our project here, I started feeling overwhelmed. Our first task here implied research work: getting to know better the phenomenon of human trafficking, and we found out alarming numbers. In 2014, the trickle of a few hundred women a year grew to nearly 1,500. The following year, it increased again to 5,600. In 2016, at least 11,009 Nigerian women and girls arrived on Italian shores. The numbers for  2018 are expected to be in the same ascending line. The journey, for these girls is a nightmare of abuse and violence, many are forced into prostitution already in Libya in the so-called connection houses to start paying the debt contracted with traffickers at the time of departure – which varies between 20 and 50 thousand euros – and that is often signed by a voodoo ritual, known as juju oath. They believe that if they don’t fulfill their obligations, demonic spirits would haunt them daily and eventually drive them mad. The help exists, though; some organizations or NGOs are fully committed in assisting them to break free from their traffickers. Unfortunately, most NGOs initiatives to change the status quo are blocked due to the lack of funds and of the authorities’ disengagement to resolve the problem. Only an extremely small part of victims of human trafficking are are placed in a safe house, which is supposed to try to integrate them into European life with school and job training, with the goal of becoming independent. Having this information gathered, I wondered how these women felt physically, psychologically and emotionally after they escaped from that hell. Well, I met them through Donne di Benin City, an organization whose goal is freeing the victims, but at the same time making the voices of the victims heard by the public institutions. As surprising as it may be, these brave women found strength to laugh, enjoy life and look forward to the future with optimism and hopefulness.[:en]There is no doubt that the idea of volunteering abroad is a big leap of faith into the unknown, so when I first heard about “IRETI- Empowering Women and Strengthening Socioeconomic Integration” project in Palermo, I just said “No”. I thought I had multiple reasons to refuse: I was feeling I was too old to participate. I was frightened not to accommodate easily in a new city and environment. I feared not being able to fully relate to the topic or simply not being able to help enough. But then, I started to wondering myself if finding excuses for not going, not trying or not helping are actually..not helping me? So, with this in mind, I decided to give it a try, after all, in the worst case scenario, I could just call it quits and just return home. Useless to say that wasn’t the case. My first week here passed in a heartbeat, adjusting myself living in Palermo being surprisingly easy, as was discovering Palermo’s rich culture, history and of course the vibrant nightlife.

As the days passed and we started focusing on our project here, I started feeling overwhelmed. Our first task here implied research work: getting to know better the phenomenon of human trafficking, and we found out alarming numbers. In 2014, the trickle of a few hundred women a year grew to nearly 1,500.

 

The following year, it increased again to 5,600. In 2016, at least 11,009 Nigerian women and girls arrived on Italian shores. The numbers for  2018 are expected to be in the same ascending line. The journey, for these girls is a nightmare of abuse and violence, many are forced into prostitution already in Libya in the so-called connection houses to start paying the debt contracted with traffickers at the time of departure – which varies between 20 and 50 thousand euros – and that is often signed by a voodoo ritual, known as juju oath.

 

They believe that if they don’t fulfill their obligations, demonic spirits would haunt them daily and eventually drive them mad. The help exists, though; some organizations or NGOs are fully committed in assisting them to break free from their traffickers. Unfortunately, most NGOs initiatives to change the status quo are blocked due to the lack of funds and of the authorities’ disengagement to resolve the problem. Only an extremely small part of victims of human trafficking are are placed in a safe house, which is supposed to try to integrate them into European life with school and job training, with the goal of becoming independent. Having this information gathered, I wondered how these women felt physically, psychologically and emotionally after they escaped from that hell.

 

Well, I met them through Donne di Benin City, an organization whose goal is freeing the victims, but at the same time making the voices of the victims heard by the public institutions. As surprising as it may be, these brave women found strength to laugh, enjoy life and look forward to the future with optimism and hopefulness.[:]

[:it]Diamo il via al progetto “IRETI – Empowering Women and Strengthening Socioeconomic Integration”[:]

[:it]Ci siamo! Il progetto “IRETI – Empowering Women and Strengthening Socioeconomic Integration”  è ufficialmente iniziato.

Il 12 e il 14 Dicembre abbiamo ospitato a Palermo i rappresentanti delle organizzazioni partner provenienti da Spagna (Biderbost Boscan & Rochin BB&R), Inghilterra (Ubele Initiative) e Romania (A.U.R. Asociatia Nationala a Specialistilor in Resurse Umane).

Il progetto è stato co-finanziato dall’Agenzia Nazionale Indire all’interno del programma Erasmus plus della Commissione Europea.

Sono state due giornate intense durante le quali abbiamo avuto modo di conoscerci, condividere le esperienze delle realtà locali e costruire insieme le basi per un percorso di scambio internazionale che ci accompagnerà per i prossimi due anni.

Il progetto IRETI nasce dall’incontro con un volontario di H.R.Y.O. proveniente dalla Nigeria, che ci ha fatto riflettere sulle condizioni che le ragazze provenienti dalla Nigeria e soprattutto dalla città di Benin City si trovano ad affrontare. Infatti, l’ltalia detiene un triste primato nello sfruttamento della prostituzione e i dati a livello europeo sono allarmanti.

Queste donne sono reclutate con la promessa di una vita migliore. La maggior parte delle vittime ha 17-28 anni, un basso livello di istruzione e proviene da famiglie povere. Una volta raggiunta l’Europa, vengono immesse sul mercato della prostituzione che diventa una trappola per molti di loro. Poiché vivono in un ambiente svantaggiato, sono spesso vittime di violenza ed esclusione sociale senza avere una reale possibilità di uscire dalla prostituzione.

“IRETI – Empowering Women and Strengthening Socioeconomic Integration” nasce dal desiderio di quattro organizzazioni non governative provenienti da Italia, Spagna, Inghilterra e Romania per sostenere queste donne.  La scelta della parola IRETI non è casuale, in Yoruba, la lingua più parlata in Nigeria, IRETI significa speranza. Il progetto mira a migliorare i processi di integrazione sociale, la promozione della parità tra uomini e donne e in particolare l’uguaglianza attraverso la promozione di imprenditoria femminile.

Per rispondere all’esigenza di fornire una formazione capace di dare input costruttivi e reali, abbiamo deciso di creare uno spazio per queste donne. Questo spazio si concretizzerà in momenti di formazione e confronto e servirà ad aumentare le loro competenze a livello informatico, linguistico e tecnico/commerciale e contemporaneamente a formare operatori nell’ambito dell’educazione agli adulti.

Il progetto permetterà ai partecipanti di entrare in contatto con una realtà multiculturale e creare una rete dove idee, passioni e sogni potranno entrare in contatto ed essere confrontate.[:]